Ritual Prayers of Muslims

Al-Salât

وَأَنْ أَقِيمُوا الصَّلَاةَ وَاتَّقُوهُ ۚ

“Observe Prayer [al-Salât] and take Him as a shield” (6:72).

Religion is of two types, religion of Allâh which He has taught to His Messengers, and the religion of His created being. The religion with Allâh is Islam (3:19). The religion which comes from Allâh is your dispensation to which you should submit yourself. It is Allâh Who determines its actions. The formal or ritual Prayer (- al-Salât) is one of His Command for a Muslim, which must be obeyed.  The Command of formal Prayer is second in rank after shahâda, the declaration of the unity of Allâh and the prophethood of Muhammad (pbuh). Allâh says He has “prescribed certain rites of sacrifice (and worship) for every people” (22:34). The rites of the Muslims are, besides fasting and Hajj (Pilgrimage to Makkah; 2:196), their ritual Prayers, exemplified by the Holy Prophet (pbuh). These are to be performed five times a day at specified times. Their time are prescribed in the Qur’ân (2:238; 4:103; 11:114; 17:78; 30:17).  

The recitation of al-Fâtihah, the opening seven verses of the Holy Qur’ân (1:1–7), is the central element of each formal Prayer. The words and the movements of this Prayer (al-Salât) have been prescribed (22:26) and transmitted in all their details by the All-Mighty through the Holy Prophet (pbuh). When you reflect upon the Words of al-Fâtihah, it becomes clear that this act of worship attracts Allâh’s Rahîmîyyat (His special Mercifulness) that shows you the venue to His servanthood (‘abûdîyyat; 1:5), and demands that you strive hard as you tread on this path in order to attain His nearness and attention (29:69). The Holy Prophet (pbuh), while referring to the seven verses of al-Fâtihah, said, “Allâh says, I have divided the Prayer (al-Salât) equally between Me and My servant. Half for Me and half for My servant, who may get from Me what he asks.” Referring to al-Fâtihah, Allâh said, “When My servant says, With the Name of Allâh, the Most Gracious, the Ever Merciful (1:1), My servant is remembering Me. When My servant says, All type of perfect and true praise belongs to Allâh alone, the Lord of the worlds (1:2), My servant is praising Me. When My servant says, The Most Gracious, the Ever Merciful (1:3), My servant is glorifying Me. When My servant says, Master of the Day of Requital (1:4), My servant has yielded himself to My Judgment.” This is the first half of al-Fâtihah, which relates to Allâh and belongs to Him. Allâh said, “Then the servant says, (Lord!) You alone do we worship, and You alone do we implore for help (1:5). This is shared between Me and My servant. When My servant says, Lead us to the exact right path till we reach the goal, The path of those on whom You have bestowed (Your) blessings, those who have not incurred (Your) displeasure, and those who have not gone astray (1:6–7), these words are reserved for My servants, who may have whatever they ask” (transmitted by Abû Muslim). Thus, the verses 6-7 of al-Fâtihah are for the servant of Allâh alone as the first four verses were for Allâh alone.  Based on the foregoing, then, you may realize the necessity of reciting the verses of al-Fâtihah in all ritual Prayers. Allâh says, “Different however is the case of those devoted to the Prayers, those persons who remain constant and steadfast in their Prayers” (70:22–23). Here you should ponder over verses 70:22–35 to understand what the differences are and what status shall be granted as a reward of these differences.

The rituals of formal Prayer (al-Salât) are both internal and external by virtue of the words and actions. When performed properly and regularly, “al-Salât restrains (its observer) from indecency and abominable things and loathsome deeds and from all that runs counter to reason” (29:45). Its gesticulations are the outward manifestation of your inner yearnings and longing for your Master. This does not mean, however, that if these postures were not enacted, Allâh would not know of your inner yearnings. He knows you better than you know yourself.

هُوَ أَعْلَمُ بِكُمْ إِذْ أَنشَأَكُم مِّنَ الْأَرْضِ وَإِذْ أَنتُمْ أَجِنَّةٌ فِي بُطُونِ أُمَّهَاتِكُمْ ۖ فَلَا تُزَكُّوا أَنفُسَكُمْ ۖ هُوَ أَعْلَمُ بِمَنِ اتَّقَىٰ

“He knows you full well (since) when He created you from the earth and when you were embryos in the wombs of your mothers. So make no pretensions to the purity of your souls. It is He Who knows best who (truly and fully) guards against evil” (53:32).

Al-Salât is an outward expression of the cords that are connected to your inner self. Therefore, it is just not possible that while there is a yearning and passion in the depths of your heart, there would be no corresponding outward manifestation of these inner conditions. Al-Salât is also the Prayer of your spirit (nafsنفس ). Your human spirit (nafs) also has a need to bow and prostrate before its Master. Therefore, bowing and prostration of the spirit must be manifested in external form, because there is a connection between substance and form of the body and the soul. If the two do not correspond, then there is little benefit to the Prayer.    

Allâh says, فَأَيْنَمَا تُوَلُّوا فَثَمَّ وَجْهُ اللَّهِ  “so whatsoever way you may turn (you will find) there is Allâh’s attention (2:115). “He is with you wherever you may be,” وَهُوَ مَعَكُمْ أَيْنَ مَا كُنتُمْ  (57:4), signifying that you can perform the acts of worship anyplace, even in the houses of worship of unbelievers, provided that you are attending to Allâh alone and not to any other deity, and that the place of worship is clean for your prostrations. It matters not if you pray in a synagogue, a church, or a temple, because it is you who are speaking to your Exalted Creator, and you are following His Divine Law, not following the law of whoever may be the caretaker of the building you worship in.

Some might balk with offering Prayer on the dust of the earth.  Allâh made the earth submissive to you, you walk on it, and He commands you to place on that very earth the noblest part you have— that is, your face. The face of the earth and the face of the servant are joined in prostration. The earth is neither inferior, nor is the one who has placed his face on the earth superior, anymore. In this state of abasement and self-negation, you are nearer to Allâh than you are in any other state.  

The Command, “So stand you upright, as you have been commanded” فَاسْتَقِمْ كَمَا أُمِرْتَ;11:112), refers to the standing position in the formal Prayer (iqâma). Allâh has prescribed the state of standing before Him for Divine Conversation with Him, because of His Attribute of al-Qayyûm (the Self-Existing, whose Essence Suffices for His Self-Existence). Your access to this Attribute is in proportion to your detachment from everything that is not Allâh.  

While standing before Him (iqâmaإقاما ), you utter only what your Lord has taught you to say – the Words of al-Fâtihah. Your standing (iqâma) soon transitions into bowing (rakû‘ركوع ). Once again, the rising after the rakû‘ is yet another iqâma.  This iqâma is the position to be taken before the ultimate humility, the prostration. You can prostrate into humility only from an otherwise firm iqâma (standing position) before. When humility gushes forth from a humbled self while prostrated, then that is not only basic humility but truly a melted ego before none but the All-Mighty. Jalâl al-Dîn Rûmî said, “The purpose of ritual Prayer is not that you should bow and prostrate yourself all the day. Its purpose is that you should develop a prayerful attitude, maintaining the spiritual state obtained in Prayer at all times, whether asleep, or awake, at work or rest, you should always remember Allâh, you should be one of those who are constantly at their Prayers” (Rûmî in Fîhi ma Fîhi). The Holy Prophet (pbuh) said, “There is no Prayer without the presence of heart.”

Allâh addresses human beings in their totality, both in their outer and in their inner selves. Therefore, your outward cleanliness when you stand for Prayers is emphasized (4:43; 5:6). The inner spiritual purification can be achieved either through the source of life, which is water, or through an element of life, which is dust (5:6). Every rule of the Divine Law, such as washing before Prayers, has a transformative effect on the soul, and that includes every aspect of ablution, such as the washing of your hands, face, and feet and the rinsing of your mouth. Washing your hands inwardly means abandoning that which is required to be abandoned. It is to forgo what your hands possess of worldly things from which they are permitted to abstain. The inner meaning of washing your face corresponds to the washing of your heart for divine reception. Washing your feet would correspond to moving your feet to leave for such obligatory acts as going to Prayers and your not moving among people with pride but with moderate gait.  Rinsing your mouth corresponds to cleansing the utterances of your tongue. Thus, the outward cleansing has a literal meaning for your body but a figurative and causative meaning of inward hygiene for your soul. You move from the outer sensory act to the inner spiritual act, and not vice versa.  

Formal Prayer (al-Salât) has been termed a centerpiece of all worship, and du‘â (supplication, or call for help) is the keystone of al-Salât. When you bow and prostrate yourself before Allâh with perfect conviction, immersed in deep love, full of hope, in extreme devotion, with a full resolve of loyalty, eliminating all types of heedlessness, shunning vanity, and advancing towards Him fully conscious, your Salât not only come to fruition, but you come close to Allâh. Salât prayer that is taught to Muslims, in its perfect form with all its gesticulation of bowing and prostrating, is a euphoric, ecstatic state. Through Salât prayer you fathom the existence of Allâh, and you recognize with perfect certitude that He is here and He is Omnipresent.

The Morning Prayer (al-Fajr الْفَجْر) is characterized by “the regular recital of the Qur’ân at dawn,” because the Holy Prophet (pbuh), under divine inspiration, used to lengthen his recitation then. Such recitation of the Holy Qur’ân is called mashhûdan (مَشْهُودًا), meaning that it is “acceptable or witnessed by Allâh,” corresponding to the concentration of mind and thought at this time. Allâh says:

أَقِمِ الصَّلَاةَ لِدُلُوكِ الشَّمْسِ إِلَىٰ غَسَقِ اللَّيْلِ وَقُرْآنَ الْفَجْرِ ۖ إِنَّ قُرْآنَ الْفَجْرِ كَانَ مَشْهُودًا

“Observe Prayer at the declining and paling of the sun, on to the complete darkness (in diverse hours) of the night, and recite the Qur’ân at dawn. Verily, the regular recital (of the Qur’ân) at dawn is (especially) acceptable (to God) and witnessed (by the angels)” (17:78).

Thus, the Morning Prayer becomes a means of attaining deeper insight into the realm of spiritual truths and of achieving communion with all that is holy. Imâm Ibn al-Fadzal Muhammad Râzî said that the “witness” (mashhûd, مَشْهُود) to which the Holy Qur’ân refers here is the spark of God that illuminates the human soul (h). It heightens its inner perception at the time when the darkness and stillness of night begins to give way to life, just as the light of the day gives light to the darkness and removes it.

Then there is a Supererogatory (tahajjûdتهجٌد ) Prayer, which you do after getting up from sleep (17:79). This is the best time for Divine Discourse (17:79; 32:16; 73:2). Such are the Prayers of lovers of Allâh, and of those who possess divine secrets and hidden knowledge (- sirr alûhîyyat سِرٌ إلوهيت ). As Hâfiz put it so eloquently: “The moon starts singing when everyone is asleep and the planets throw a bright robe around their shoulders, and whirl up close to her side. Once I asked the moon, Why do you and your sweet friends not perform like that to a larger crowd? The whole sky chorus responded, The admission price to hear the lofty minstrels speech of Love is affordable only to those who have not exhausted themselves dividing God all day and now need rest.” Someone said: “Faith is like the bird that feels the light and sings when the dawn is still dark”. There are moments in this Prayer and worship where there is ascension of the human soul to experience the divine signs in ‘Âlam-i-mithâl; therein are the moments when the Exalted One descends from His Throne (20:5; 23:86) to the nearest heaven to greet those who are yearning for Him. This is the time when your human soul draws near to its Creator.

Adhân آذان is the call to the formal five daily Prayers and the Friday Prayer (62:9). This call is the announcement of the arrival of the time of ritual Prayer. It is also a notification of Divine Self-Disclosure, so that the human soul may have an opportunity to purify itself and prepare itself to come close to its Lord. Iqâma (standing up before the beginning of the Prayer) is the invitation for Divine Conversation. In iqâma you stand upright with folded hands, just as you will stand before your Lord on the Day of Judgment. When you are submerged in this state of worship, you experience a previously unknown pleasure. It is in this state that you speak out:

قُلْ إِنَّ صَلَاتِي وَنُسُكِي وَمَحْيَايَ وَمَمَاتِي لِلَّهِ رَبِّ الْعَالَمِينَ

“Surely, my Prayer and my sacrifice and my living and my dying are all for the sake of Allâh, the Lord of the worlds” (6:162).

Objections against the institution of Prayer

There are many who doubt the effect of ritual or formal Prayer. From their doubtful minds come many objections against the institution of Prayer; essentially, they say that these Prayers are said in vain, that they have no effect. Evidently, such sceptics assert that no sooner do you give Him a command than He obligingly must carry it out. However, you must never forget that Allâh is your Master, not your servant, not an underling who must give you whatever you ask of Him. The condition imposed by Allâh is that your supplications should be presented before Him with great intensity and with sincerity in a way, which “pleases” Him:

بَلْ إِيَّاهُ تَدْعُونَ فَيَكْشِفُ مَا تَدْعُونَ إِلَيْهِ إِن شَاءَ وَتَنسَوْنَ مَا تُشْرِكُونَ

“Nay, but you will call upon Him alone (and pray to Him), then He will, if He please, relieve (you) of that distress for (the removal of) which you called upon Him” (6:41)

Unfortunately, Prayers and supplications are often not submitted with the required earnest and requisite conditions. They may be on the lips, but the heart is full of neglect, laziness, or pride, and the mind is busy with mundane issues. Such cannot be called true Prayer; rather it is a mere show of Prayer. Allâh admonishes such: “So woe to those who Pray, but are unmindful of their Prayer (and ignore the spirit and aim of it)” (107:4–5). Such is the practice of many, including the practice of many self-declared spiritual leaders. You have to be aware of such practices and such claimants. Allâh leads only those to the path of success who strive in His way with all their heart, attention, and vigor.  

Muslims are enjoined to pray five times a day, and the Holy Prophet (pbuh) has taught us supplications for many occasions of life. Yet, for your personal urgent needs, you need to engage in special Salât Prayers. Repetition of memorized words of a certain Prayer in an indolent, heedless, and careless manner, without proper conviction and attention, cannot be truly termed as Prayer. Nothing can be achieved without a strenuous striving. For the Salât Prayer to reach its proper destination at the Exalted Threshold, and for you to become the recipient of His gracious bounties, your hard work and focused attention is required. To engage in Salât Prayer properly is like going into a deathlike state as you read:

وَالَّذِينَ جَاهَدُوا فِينَا لَنَهْدِيَنَّهُمْ سُبُلَنَا ۚ

 “And those who strive hard in Our cause We will certainly guide them in the ways that lead to Us” (29:69)

Would it be fair for someone who is full of vanity and pride, who prays for show, who is sunk in laziness, sloth, neglect, and carelessness, whose thoughts are occupied with worldly matters, to be considered as deserving of his Lords bounties as one who strives in His ways, who leaves his bed in the wee hours of the night, and who engages in dhikrذكر (devotions aiming to Divine Remembrance and Divine Discourse) with all his heart, with all his might, and with his utmost efforts only for seeking Allâh’s pleasure, and whose Prayers and his sacrifices, his living and his dying are all for the sake of Allâh, the Lord of the worlds? (cf. 6:162).

Another objection raised against the institution of Prayer is that there are many who never pray. They argue that there are atheists, who never turn to God for the fulfilment of their needs and alleviation of their suffering, and there are others who call upon already-dead people for help. There are still others who do not believe in the doctrine of the acceptance of Prayer and are wholly dependent on worldly plans and stratagems for the solution to their difficulties. Yet, the sceptics say, the problems of such people are also solved. Therefore, a natural question arises: What is the difference between those who never pray (or who pray to dead people), and those who call upon Allâh for help? The answer to this question is in the verse with which a Muslim starts his Prayer, namely: “With the name of Allâh (Who is) al-Rahmân and (Who is) al-Rahîm.” In other words, Allâh’s Mercy manifests itself in two ways: the way of Rahmân and the way of Rahîm. His Attribute of Rahmânîyyat necessitates that He bestow His bounties, His Mercy, and His kindliness without your asking for them. His Attribute Rahîmîyyat, however, comes into play in response to your asking for something. Allâh’s Grace and kindness (Rahmânîyyat) is for everyone, irrespective of his caste, creed, colour, or religion, in the same way that the warmth of His sun is the same for everyone. Those who do not pray get a share from the divine bounties of Rahmânîyyat that are for everyone, but remain deprived of His bounties that come from His Attribute of Rahîmîyyat, His special Mercifulness. When the Prayers of the sincere believer are accepted out of His special Mercifulness, and when the supplicant is informed from Allâh that the plans of his enemies against him shall fail, then any and all efforts on the part of his opponent will be in vain.

There are some, though they believe in the existence of God and concede that He grants blessings and bounties, hold the view that there is no necessity of supplicating and petitioning Allâh for the solution to their problems, because they are saying, in effect, “He is All-Knowing, All-Aware, Beneficent, and Merciful, and thus He is even more aware of our problems and our troubles. To pray to Him would be telling Him what He already knows.” In such people are hidden traits of vanity and haughtiness. Again, for the attainment of those bounties of Allâh that are related to His Attribute Rahmânîyyat, there is no need for Prayers and supplications, because everyone is granted them without asking. Such have no knowledge of the sweetness and the beauty of the of those bounties that come from His Attribute of Rahîmîyyat that is reserved for those who ask and beg.  

Those who negate the efficacy of formal Prayer are denying Allâh’s Powers over everything. They consider that all events are happening at “random,” or by “nature.” They apparently forget that Allâh has invested Prayer with powerful effects, more effective than the dousing effect of water on fire. They are mistaken who imagine that Prayer has nothing to do with the fulfilment of their needs, or that the institution of Prayer is an unfounded notion coming from a superstitious mind, or that it is a dogma. On the contrary, it is a tried-and-true prescription.

Some people believe that Prayer is nothing but an act of worship, that it would perhaps earn a reward in the hereafter. The notion those rituals Prayers are only for the hereafter, that they have no effect in the present world, is incomplete and inconsistent. If Prayers were ineffective in this world, what logical argument would you have for it being effective in the hereafter? It should be noted here that Allâh has given you in the Holy Qur’ân historical examples of people whose Prayers were granted. Miracles were manifested at their hands. Allâh not only accepted their Prayers but also spoke to them and revealed the future to them. Who else but He can answer the call of the afflicted person and remove his distress? (27:62) Would it be equally befitting that a careless person, who never prays, should benefit from His Grace and His Mercy to the same extent as another who seeks His pleasure and His attention and His favours with all his heart, with great striving and sincerity, standing before Him in the greater part of the night, immersed in awe? (73:20).

Sometimes it happens that Allâh in His Perfect Wisdom has accepted the Prayer of the supplicant in a manner that is appropriate for the supplicant, yet that person out of ignorance has not recognized the subtle bounties of the Lord, for he does not have that deep perception of the circumstances of the matter, nor is he aware of the fine spiritual realities. He says:

وَعَسَىٰ أَن تَكْرَهُوا شَيْئًا وَهُوَ خَيْرٌ لَّكُمْ ۖ وَعَسَىٰ أَن تُحِبُّوا شَيْئًا وَهُوَ شَرٌّ لَّكُمْ ۗ وَاللَّهُ يَعْلَمُ وَأَنتُمْ لَا تَعْلَمُونَ

“But it may be that a thing is hard upon you though it is (really) good for you, and it may be that you love a thing while it is bad for you. Allâh knows (all things) while you do not know” (2:216)

If a thing asked for would be harmful to you, Allâh’s non-acceptance of such a Prayer is in fact tantamount to His acceptance of it. Consider, for example, how a child who, in ignorance, wants to catch hold of a flame of fire because he is attracted by the flames brilliance. In spite of his cries, would a prudent mother allow him to do so? Many of your desires may lead to pitfalls, but Allâh can save you by His refusals; His great Mercy can protect you from the perils of your weak or misguided desires and can constantly provide you with great unasked-for gifts.

Notion of Predestination

Supplication and the doctrine of ritual Prayers is brought into question by those who believe that whatever is going to happen is predetermined and must happen, and those things that are not going to happen are predestined not to happen, a conclusion that renders moot the issue of Prayer or supplication. The answer to this is that laws of nature govern all affairs in this universe, and you, too, despite your volition, are deriving great benefits from these predestined laws. Your safety in the air and water and your means of comfort all depend on the consistency of these predestined laws. Hence, predestination is dominant and covers every affair, yet predestination does not mean nullifying all knowledge or discrediting all means. If you, using your free will, put your hand into fire, would it be in order for an onlooker to say that if it is decreed that your hand would remain unharmed, it will remain unharmed?

Anyone who thinks that an objective can be achieved without the use of means, spiritual or physical, is, in fact, negating the Wisdom of Allâh and denying His measures, His Laws, His Decrees, and His taqdîrتقدير. Allâh, the High, has tied His divine measures and decrees to certain causative agents, and these causative agents share intricate links with one another. Yet, He has also created means and sources of averting the consequences of these causes. In the case of a lethal illness, the outcome can be different, either by relying only on predestination and not seeking treatment or by going to a physician in order to cure the disease. Relying on predestination (taqdîr, kismet) makes the science of medicine useless. In this example, proponents of predestination contradict themselves when they refuse the predestined effect of a cure by not seeking it.

Hence, in spite of your faith in predestination, if you rely on good medicine and you find that medicines are not without effect, then why should you deny the effects of Prayer? To concede that a certain antibiotic will kill bacterial infections if used but not to accept that passionate and humble supplications to Allâh, full of high resolve, can be effective would be an unfair discrimination. In simple words, taqdîr (predestination) is Allâh’s Law, His Intention, His Knowledge, and His Decree that if you are thirsty and you drink water, your thirst will be quenched, that if you are hungry and you eat food, your hunger will be satisfied, and that if you are in difficulty and you pray, your sufferings will be alleviated. It has always been Allâh’s Law that humble and tearful supplications made to Him are bound to provoke a response from Allâh’s Mercifulness. The doctrine of prayer is brought into question by those who believe that whatever is going to happen is predetermined and must happen, and that things that are not going to happen are predestined not to happen, a conclusion that renders moot the issue of prayer. The answer to this is that laws of nature govern all affairs in this universe, and we all, despite our volition, are deriving great benefits from these predestined laws. Our safety in the air and water and our means of comfort all depend on the consistency of these predestined laws. Predestination is dominant and covers every affair, yet predestination does not mean nullifying all knowledge or discrediting all means. If out of your free will, you put your hand into fire, would it be in order for an onlooker to say that if it is decreed that your hand would remain unharmed, it will remain unharmed?

Anyone who thinks that an objective can be achieved without the use of means, spiritual or physical, negates the Wisdom of Allâh and denies His measures, His Laws, His Decrees, and His taqdîr. Allâh, the High, has tied His divine measures and decrees to certain causative agents, and these causative agents share intricate links with one another. Yet, He has also created means and sources of averting the consequences of these causes. Even in the case of a lethal illness, the outcome can differ. Someone might either rely solely on predestination and not seek treatment or visit a physician in order to cure the disease. Relying on predestination (taqdîr, kismet) would make the field of medicine useless, which is an absurd proposition. In this example, proponents of predestination contradict themselves when they refuse the predestined effect of a cure by not seeking it.

If despite someone’s belief in predestination he takes medicine when in bad health, finding that they can be helpful, then such a person recognizes through his behaviour that his actions do have effects. Then why would that same person deny the effects of prayers claiming the outcome is determined anyway on grounds of predestination? To concede that a certain antibiotic will kill bacterial infections if used but not to accept that passionate and humble supplications to Allâh, full of high resolve, can be effective would be an unfair discrimination. In simple words, taqdîr (predestination) is Allâh’s Law, His Intention, His Knowledge, and His Decree that if you are thirsty and you drink water, your thirst will be quenched, that if you are hungry and you eat food, your hunger will be satisfied, and that if you are in difficulty and you pray, your sufferings will be alleviated. It has always been Allâh’s Law that humble and tearful supplications made to Him are bound to provoke a response from Allâh’s Mercifulness.

There are two types of predestination: One type is predestination that cannot be averted, since it is a part of Divine Law—death, for example. The other is the predestination that can be averted with the help of Prayer and Divine Will—for example, access to water, food, and medicinal cures, as previously cited. There is a saying of the Holy Prophet (pbuh) concerning Prayer and destiny: “The Prayer can avert the Hand of Destiny.” Both words, taqdîr (predestination) and qudrat (absolute Divine Power), have the same root, qadara قَدَر, which means “to decree” or  “to decide.” Allâh is alQâdîr, the All-Determiner, Who made and determined everything according to His measure. He says: فَقَدَرْنَا فَنِعْمَ الْقَادِرُونَ  “Thus did We determine, and how good We are at determining!” (77:23). This does not mean that after Allâh had made this universe from His qudrat His Power and Determination, and after He had laid down the laws under which the universe must operate (taqdîr), He became bereft of all authority and fell into a slumber and left every affair to His laws. Allâh’s Sovereignty and His full control continue to be exercised over His creation at every moment. Hence, to deny the effect of Prayer is to deny His control over His own laws. Prayer, as an attracting and intervening force, is a part of His Plan (taqdîr), and like other laws, it can become a means of achieving your objectives. Everything responds instantly to His Call, and controlling the strings of all laws lies in His Hands.

وَلِلَّهِ مُلْكُ السَّمَاوَاتِ وَالْأَرْضِ وَمَا بَيْنَهُمَا ۚ يَخْلُقُ مَا يَشَاءُ ۚ وَاللَّهُ عَلَىٰ كُلِّ شَيْءٍ قَدِيرٌ

“To Allâh belongs the sovereignty of the heavens and the earth and all that lies between the two. He creates what He will, for He is the Possessor of full power to do all that He will.” (5:17).